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Krita Cloud Brushes – Part II

18th Jan 2017 0

This is Part II of my Cloud Brushes Set for Krita.
It’s not like I use this particular set that much (there are so many instances where you actually need to paint clouds), but I haven’t seen cloud brush sets around often, so I chose to start with these.

You can download part I of the set here. When I’ll have enough stuff shared to justify a new section on the website I’ll put them all together in the same page.

As I already said, there are a few small things to point out:

– I like my popup palette in Krita to have 12 brush icons (it’s just a matter of preference), so my sets will always be made of 12 brushes. When the brushes exceed this number, I’ll split them into multiple sets (like Clouds I, Clouds II, etc).

Krita Cloud Brushes

– for the cloud brushes in particular I had started doing some research in metheorology so that I could name each brush the proper way (cirrocumulus, altostratus, etc). Then I stopped because I’m not mental:)

– I believe there’a a bug in the way bundles are packed in Krita (which I’m about to report), so the safe – albeit a bit less straightforward – way for me to share these brushes is still “the old way”.
Instructions are below.
I would recommend watching the short video below before you download, it will show how the brushes are used and what they look like.

Download

Cloud Brushes part II
 

Installation

The zip contains two folders: “brushes” and “paintoppresets”. You have to move the content of these folders into the similarly named folders, brushes and paintoppresets, in your Krita resources directory, as follows:

  • Linux

Unzip downloaded file into $HOME/.local/share/krita/ (merge if prompted)

  • Windows

Unzip downloaded file into C:\Users\YOURUSERNAME\AppData\Roaming\krita (merge if prompted)

  • OSX

Unzip downloaded file ~/Library/Application Support/Krita/ (merge if prompted)

Krita Cloud Brushes I Usage and Previews

The thumbnail on the left is the icon of the brush as you’ll find it in your pop up palette, the strip on the right offers a preview of the brush stroke.
All previews have been painted with a single brush stroke, just varying the pressure.

puggioni-clouds13

puggioni-clouds14

Krita Cloud Brush 14

puggioni-clouds15

Krita Cloud Brush 15

puggioni-clouds16

Krita Cloud Brush 16

puggioni-clouds17

Krita Cloud Brush 17

puggioni-clouds18

Krita Cloud Brush 18

puggioni-clouds19

Krita Cloud Brush 19

puggioni-clouds20

Krita Cloud Brush 20

puggioni-clouds21

Krita Cloud Brush 21

puggioni-clouds22

Krita Cloud Brush 22

puggioni-clouds23

Krita Cloud Brush 23

puggioni-clouds24

Krita Cloud Brush 24

Licence:

All brushes are released under Creative Commons 4.0, CC BY-SA to Paolo Puggioni, www.paolopuggioni.com

This license lets you remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as you credit the creator and license your new creations under the identical terms.

by Paolo Puggioni

Freakshow – Thrannak Concepts

17th Jan 2017 0

Second main characters of our comic Freak Show, Thrannak will be the one to take care of things when the situation requires physical strenght.

As opposed to Zaquida, Thrannak comes from one of the Transhumanist worlds, and all her augmentations have been designed to make her more effective in combat.

Freak Show - Thrannak Character Sheet 1

As you can see, all her augmentations are installed under her skin, and are developed when needed.
Initially I had thought the seams should be as inconspicuous as possible when the weapons are hidden.
Then we decided she would look thougher with lines running on her body in intricate patterns, like a Maori warrior or something like that, so I’ll make another version to see how she looks like.

John and I haven’t really decided yet if the communication devices implanted in Thrannak’s skull should be more or less visible.
In the concept I made them hidden under her scalp, whereas John would like them to bulge a bit more.

I’ll have to look into that too, although I have to confess that at least in “rest mode” I’d be happier for them to look more like scars.

I have to point out that these concepts are just meant to be a study of how Thrannak would look like in general, all the clothes she is wearing right now are just to avoid drawing her naked:)

I’m going to make a set of concepts to design the clothes she’ll be waering when fighting in the Freak Show, and then more sets with maybe a combat suit, generic overalls and so on.

I really dislike the “super hero costume” kind of idea, so I’d like to change her attire as often as possible as the comic develops, and instead use other elements to make her more iconic and recognizable.

Next bunch of Freak Show concepts coming up soon.

by Paolo Puggioni

Freak Show, a New Comic

12th Jan 2017 2

I am very, very happy to announce that John Ayliff and I have started working on Freak Show, our very own comic.

John is the author of Belt Three, published by Harper Collins.

Before he became a full time writer, John and I used to work together at Jagex, where I was Lead Concept Artist and he was Senior Game Developer, one of the guys who wrote the storylines of our Runescape quests.
His story lines were always a pleasure to read. Deep, unpredictable, imaginative, exciting.
Every time I was told I was to start working on one of his Runescape quests I thought “oh, this is going to be good”, and I was never wrong.
My respect for his work is what prompted me to get in touch with him a few months ago to propose a collaboration on a comic.

I always wanted to try my hand at working on something as challenging as a comic book, but for one reason or another I never thought I was ready for it.
For an artist, it’s like the end-of-level boss, the Emperor Palpatine of our craft.
It requires complete mastery of perspective, composition, visual storytelling, anatomy, character design, plus a dozen other things I can’t even think of right now.
At the same time it’s a huge endeavour, it requires planning and perseverance.

A few months ago – I can’t remember what triggered the thought – it suddenly dawned on me:
“Hey, maybe now I can sort of do that”.
“Oh, and that”.
“Ah I can also handle that bit if I try hard enough!”

So, although I still had some doubts about my ability to do everything to professional standards (I’m not a professional comic artist yet!), I got in touch with a professional writer – John – who was happily willing to work on this together.

After a few months of email exchanges we came up with a plan, a name and a synopsis.
I obviously can’t share too many details about Freak Show yet, mostly because it’s still in its early stages and many things might still change.

Freak Show is set a few centuries in the future, where a social struggle is ongoing between “altered” humans (called Transhumans, those who enhanced their body through technological or genetic means) and “pure humans”.

On some of the planets Pure humans are predominant, so Transhumans are regarded as Freaks, held captive, and displayed in road shows, even forced to fight against each other.

The story focuses on a small group of characters, and how their story develops within one of these freak shows.

The concept below is the first design I made for one of the main characters.

Freak Show - Zaquida Character Sheet 1

Her name is Zaquida, and her particular augmentation allows her to interface with computers of any kind and gain control over them.
I explored different ages, and eventually we went for the third from the left, the 20-year-old.
My favourite was the 14-year-old, but the story needed a slightly older character.

For the next couple of months I’ll be concepting every bit I need for the first few pages of the comic: generic characters, spaceships, props, main characters, buildings and so on.
So you’ll see more of this in the near future.

by Paolo Puggioni

Krita Cloud Brushes I

10th Jan 2017 4

I’ve been trying to post some of my Krita brush sets for quite some time now.
Due to lack of time or other reasons I never got the chance to do it until now, so there you go.

It does take some time for me to put everything together in a way that’s usable for other people, so I’ll release all sets one by one when I can.
At the end I’ll probably create a “Downloads” section on this website so that they’ll all be easily available in the same place.

A few small things to point out:

– I like my popup palette in Krita to have 12 brush icons (it’s just a matter of preference), so my sets will always be made of 12 brushes. When the brushes exceed this number, I’ll split them into multiple sets (like Clouds I, Clouds II, etc).

Krita Cloud Brushes

– for the cloud brushes in particular I had started doing some research in metheorology so that I could name each brush the proper way (cirrocumulus, altostratus, etc). Then I stopped because I’m not mental:)

– I believe there’a a bug in the way bundles are packed in Krita (which I’m about to report), so the safe – albeit a bit less straightforward – way for me to share these brushes is still “the old way”.
Instructions are below.
I would recommend watching the short video below before you download, it will show how the brushes are used and what they look like.

Download

Cloud Brushes I

Installation

  • Linux

Unzip downloaded file into $HOME/.local/share/krita/ (merge if prompted)

  • Windows

Unzip downloaded file into C:\Users\YOURUSERNAME\AppData\Roaming\krita

  • OSX

Unzip content of zip file ~/Library/Application Support/Krita/

Krita Cloud Brushes I Usage and Previews

puggioni-clouds01
Krita Cloud Brush

puggioni-clouds02
Krita Cloud Brush

puggioni-clouds03
puggioni krita cloud brush

puggioni-clouds04
Krita Cloud Brushes

puggioni-clouds05
Krita Cloud Brushes

puggioni-clouds06
Krita cloud brush

puggioni-clouds07

puggioni-clouds08
Krita Cloud Brush

puggioni-clouds09
Krita Clouds Brush

puggioni-clouds10
Krita Clouds Brush

puggioni-clouds11
Krita Cloud Brush

puggioni-clouds12
Krita Cloud Brush

Licence:

All brushes are released under Creative Commons 4.0, CC BY-SA to Paolo Puggioni, www.paolopuggioni.com

This license lets you remix, tweak, and build upon your work even for commercial purposes, as long as you credit the creator and license your new creations under the identical terms.

by Paolo Puggioni

Game of Thrones – Time of Plenty

8th Dec 2016 0

Time of Plenty is the second illustration I made for Game of Thrones’ Lions of Casterly Rock.
If you want to have a look at the first one I posted, it’s right here.

The brief read: In a blood orange grove in Dorne, a pair of Dornish peasants (one male, one female) pick oranges from the trees. Each of the peasants carries a large basket full of oranges, and the trees in the grove are bursting with fruit.

So this is what I came up with:

Game of Thrones - Time of Plenty

I remember that when I read Game of Thrones, Dorne left me with images of Andalucia, or Southern Italy, maybe Sicily.
So that’s pretty much where I got my reference from.

I meant to add some Dornish city in the distance (as you can see from the sketch), but in the end it looked too cluttered so I decided against it.

Game of Thrones - Times of Plenty Sketch

Again, this was one of the first actual drawing I made with Krita, so I did struggle a bit to get the foliage right.
In fact, I had to make a whole new set of brushes specifically for this drawing.
As soon as I have some time I’ll make them all available for download, likely next week.

by Paolo Puggioni

Golden Tooth

1st Dec 2016 0

Golden Tooth is the first illustration I made for Lions of Casterly Rock, the latest Game of Thrones game expansion by Fantasy Flight Games.

As I said in my previous post, the card is featured together with Lannisport Treasury on the product page, which, random an event as it may be, is still a small satisfaction:)

As it always happens, the expansion has seen its release quite a long time after the art had been produced for it, as – if I remember correctly – I worked on it almost exactly a year ago.
This was also the very first professional illustration I made with Krita, and I have to admit I was quite nervous about it.

Most of the workflow with Krita is no different to that of many other drawing programs, but still, most of one’s productivity relies on muscle memory, and using new tools and brushes when you are on a deadline tends to make you feel dizzy.
The fact that everything went smooth is what eventually convinced me to stick with Linux in general, and Krita in particular.

What really made me think “ok I’m sold”, however, was the natural feel of the sketch brushes.
The one I used for Golden Tooth has evolved a bit since this sketch was made.
Still, the feeling was already pretty close to that of an actual 5B pencil.

Golden Tooth Sketch

The real struggle started with the rendering.
Getting things to a state I was happy with did take some learning.

Golden Tooth

My usual procedure would normally imply dropping colours on the canvas very loosely, then using a series of mixing brushes to blend them together and drawing finer details in when needed, close to what you would do with wet-on-wet with oils or acrylics.
The mixing brushes that ship with Krita weren’t quite exactly what I needed, so I did spend some time to create my own.
You can see some of the blending brushwork in these spot.

Blending brushes detail

Another hurdle was making custom brushes for the grass on the hills and the stones of the castle walls.
Still, somehow I managed.

Grass and texture brushes detail

These were admittedly a bit primitive, the ones I’m using now are a lot better, I’ll share them when I can.
Apparently there’s a bug in Krita that prevents bundles from including brush tips, so I have to look into that before I can share my own.

I’ll post the other cards I made for Lions of Casterly Rock next time.

by Paolo Puggioni

Lions of Casterly Rock

29th Nov 2016 0

My copy of Lions of Casterly RockFantasy Flight Games’ latest Game of Thrones expansion – has finally arrived.
I’m quite chuffed that two of the 4 cards previewed on FFG’s website are mine:)
They are Golden Tooth and Lannisport Treasury, which I’ll post in more detail next week.

The box is amazing, as all the packaging by Fantasy Flight Games always is.
Look at that. Sorry for the potato quality.

Lions of Casterly Rock - Box

Lions of Casterly Rock - Cards

I’m always happy to have another Game of Thrones thing under my belt, but this one was particularly fun to work on.
It was the first time I had done any professional work using Krita, and I remember being concerned that something would go wrong with tools I wasn’t familiar with and everything else.
Luckily all went smooth.
I’ll post them next week, this time I even remembered to keep the sketches:)

by Paolo Puggioni

The House of Blue

25th Nov 2016 0

As a result of the Spring Cleaning Frenzy I fell victim of the other day, I also finished the cover of House of Blue, the book written by my wife, nonetheless.

Now, this was a huge weight off my chest, as I was feeling really, really guilty about the huge delay in completing it.
I had actually started working on it as soon as I read the first draft; I had gathered my reference, made all my research and put together the first rough sketches. I was on a roll.
Then some paid assignment came up, momentum was lost, other deadlines popped up, and there it was, in the Unfinished Projects drawer, jumping up and down with its big puppy eyes together with all the other Lost Projects waiting to be rescued.

I hope she’ll forgive me about the delay, I’ve been feeling guilty about it for quite some time now.

Anyway, here it is.

House of Blue

I’m hugely proud of her. I should say it more often, I think.
Unfortunately, paying compliments to people and making them feel good about themselves isn’t one of my top 10 skills.
I guess it comes down to how I was brought up as a kid. I could have climbed the K2, and my dad would say to me “oooh big deal, it’s the second tallest mountain, was Everest too tall for you?”.
If I then climbed Mount Everest out of spite, my dad would say “oooh big deal, Edmund Hillary did it before you in 1953!”.
So, well, I was taught to suffer and rejoice just inside.
I’m still working on it.

But seriously, of all the hundreds of thousands of people who start writing a novel – or have an idea for an amazing novel – only less than 5% get to the end of it.
(For the obnoxious among you, yeh, I’m using vague figures. I’ve found many articles talking about it, but none of them cited their sources. So you’ll have to make do with no link and vague figures for once).
Being as it may, starting and finishing a book is a humongous, titanic, miraculous feat, and as I said I’m incredibly proud of her.
Plus, it’s a damn good read.

I shouldn’t “review” the book here, as I’m clearly biased, but if you like Magic Realism you should give it a try. You can buy it here!

by Paolo Puggioni

Black Angel

22nd Nov 2016 0

During the past few weeks I’ve been hugely, frantically busy.
That must be why I haven’t posted anything in a while.
There are indeed quite a few projects I’m working on, some of which I’ll be sharing over the next days.
All in all I am *this close* (rises his hand to show his thumb and point finger getting close) to actually having too much on my plate.

Because of that, the other day I fell victim to a case of Spring Cleaning Disease.
That’s when you start throwing away a bunch of crumpled paper because you want to tidy up just a little bit, and before you know it you are crouched under your desk scraping dirt off skirting boards with an old tooth brush.

And it’s not even Spring.

It might be because when I’m so swamped I need order, and a schedule, and a list of things neatly arranged one after the other, else I go crazy.
Whatever the reason, I started by removing some clutter from my second desk (the one where I dump the pointless crap, the unread post, pencil shavings, dirty mugs and so on. Oh and my easel).

Then I finally ordered the art books in my shelf by size and topic. I’ve been wanting to do that for months.

Then I assembled the dashcam I bought like 6 months ago and never got the time to get into my car.

After that I started to archive and back up the finished work (I do redundant backups because better safe than sorry), and since everything was safe I thought “fuck it, let’s do it now”, and installed the new Opensuse Leap 42.2.

Which is awesome, by the way.

Getting Krita and all of my documents back on my fresh install, I came across an old anatomy exercise that had been knocking around my hard drive for several months, and sice it added to my list of uncompleted tasks (and thus to my mental chaos), I decided to finish it before I committed to anything else.

So there she is, my Black Angel.
As many times before, it had started as a lazy evening practice and it became something else.

Black Angel

Once this was done, I finally put together my nice list of tasks, and on an empty, zen-like white desk I was finally ready to go ahead.

I’ll post some more stuff later this week.

by Paolo Puggioni

Beowulf and the Dragon

30th Aug 2016 1

Beowulf and the Dragon si the last of the three epic battles in Beowulf’s saga, and the last of the illustrations I made for this project.

What I LOVED about working on this set of illustrations is that in each one Beowulf is in a completely different situation or moment of his life, so I had to account for that in the design.

In the first battle Beowulf is in his prime: when he faces Grendel he is young, bold and cocky, and he goes as far as engaging him without weapons and armour, because, you know, he is too cool for those.

In the second battle, soon after he has defeated Grendel, he is obviously still young, but he is now all geared up, as Grendel’s mother is not an enemy to underestimate.

In this last battle he is an old man, so I obviously had to paint a different version of his face.
He has reigned as a wise king, regarded by everyone as a great hero, so I wanted to convey some degree of solemnity in his figure.

At this point in his life he knows he is too weak to defeat the dragon, nonetheless he dons his armour, gathers his trusted warriors and walks towards his doom as if it were just another Tuesday.

It will be his best warrior to finish off the dragon, eventually.
However, even though an old man, Beowulf is still cool enough to pull this kind of tricks.

Beowulf and The Dragon

Now, there was a funny exchange of emails with Tanner of Legends, Myths and Whiskey when I delivered the final illustration.
His feedback was pretty much “It’s cool! But it’s wrong! Beowulf and the Dragon face each other in the Dragon’s lair”.

And mine was “No! YOU are wrong! I read the book! The battle happens outside the lair, in the forest!”

So we sent each other quotes from whatever our sources were, and we soon came to the conclusion that we were using two different translations, one of which was quite blurry about the location of the battle.

So, we eventually decided to leave the background as it was.
I had messed up with his gear though, as in the first version I had painted an wooden shield, whereas in both translations it’s quite clear that Beowulf chooses his best iron shield before he leaves his hall to face the dragon.

For the literature lovers I’m pasting the passage that the illustration refers to.

Mine, by Strafford Riggs, 1933:

I go alone to engage this dragon. You shall remain here at the clearing’s edge in readiness to stand by me in case I fail. For I am an old man now, and it comes to me, as in a dream, that this will be my last adventure, my final fight.

And then:

For a moment there was a death-like stillness in the night. No sound came from the cave, and no steamy breath, and no dull glare of fire. Then with sudden roaring that caused the night to splinter and the earth to quiver in horrified response, the lordliest dragon in all the world rushed from its lair.

Tanner’s, by Ernest Kirtlan (1913?):

Then in a fury the Prince of the Weder-Geats
let a torrent of words escape from
his breast and the stout-hearted one
stormed. And his war-clear voice re-
sounded under the hoar cliffs. And
hatred was stirred, for the guardian of
the hoard recognized well the voice of
Beowulf. And that was no time to be
seeking friendship. And the breath of
the monster, the hot battle-sweat, came
forth from the rock at the first and the
earth resounded. The warrior, the Lord

of the Geats, raised his shield under the
barrow against the terrible sprite.

Funny how things can change from one translator to another.
After all, even Tolkien wrote an essay on how difficult an undertaking it was to translate something like Beowulf.

by Paolo Puggioni